Read Christian Jihad: Two Former Muslims Look at the Crusades and Killing in the Name of Christ by Ergun Mehmet Caner Emir Fethi Caner Online

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"Christian Jihad" is the story of a horrific journey of slaughter and conversion by the sword. It paints the picture of warriors, fighting in the name of religion. It is a journey into the darkest hour of Christianity--the Crusades.To most in the west, the Crusades are only a faded memory of events long past. But to the Islamic world, the "Crusaders" have never ended their"Christian Jihad" is the story of a horrific journey of slaughter and conversion by the sword. It paints the picture of warriors, fighting in the name of religion. It is a journey into the darkest hour of Christianity--the Crusades.To most in the west, the Crusades are only a faded memory of events long past. But to the Islamic world, the "Crusaders" have never ended their attempt to take over the world. The authors, intent on providing more than a mere history lesson, examine the impact of the Crusades on today, question ideas like "just war," and urge Christians to learn from the past. Best-selling & Gold Medallion award-winning co-authors of "Unveiling Islam" A balanced history of the Crusades that also answers contemporary questions regarding war and the interaction between Christianity and IslamWritten by strong evangelical scholars with solid ties to the Muslim world...

Title : Christian Jihad: Two Former Muslims Look at the Crusades and Killing in the Name of Christ
Author :
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ISBN : 9780825424038
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 240 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Christian Jihad: Two Former Muslims Look at the Crusades and Killing in the Name of Christ Reviews

  • Patrick S.
    2018-10-12 01:33

    First of all, the research that went into this book is top notch. It deals with "Christian" warfare in what I thought was a balanced enough way. However, the two problems I have with it are what the authors do at the beginning and the end. At the beginning they seem to preach that early Christians thought serving in the military was "un-Christian" and they seem to want to paint that as the "right" way from the beginning. However, in their prologue they seem to say they are suggesting that and there is a test to see if fighting can be judged based on "just war". First of all, this would only apply to people who are able to serve in a military type capacity and know beforehand whether the war is "just" or not. There is no suggestion on behavior that could lead to sin during battles rather than a whole war. Second, the authors tend to sight Christian philosophers rather than The Bible. The Bible is suppose to be where we get our moral standard from. Plus, they seem to want to cherry pick exactly which philosophers they want to sight, even some non-Christian ones. There is also no talk on warfare conducted during the Old Testament and applying principles of A.D. to B.C. times. God is never changing in His moral ways, so they seem to remain silent on the OT, in order to try and defend their NT philosophy. Again, this book does a good job of painting "Christianity" being used as a basis for war. They don't really go into, whether or not religion is used by the state as a means of trying to control a populace, esp. one where the Scriptures are forbidden to them. It really, REALLY makes you appreciate the Reformation and the heroes who were burned by agents of the state to get The Good News into the hands of the masses! Final Grade - D+

  • Thomas Irby
    2018-10-13 21:40

    Here is the thing. I have read many reviews on this book that are angry ramblings accusing the authors of being both Christ-haters and Right-Wing nut jobs. However, no review that I have read actually discusses the quality of the historical content. The attention to historical detail in this book is abysmal. This book was assigned to me in a History of the Crusades class as an example of an awful book on the Crusades. We read primary sources and compared many different accounts from Latin, Byzantine, and Muslim sources. Then we read this book. There are details in this book that are flat out wrong. For instance, the authors make the passing assertion that the Latin Crusaders took the city of Antioch in the First Crusade quickly and easily. However, every primary source shows that the siege on Antioch took 8 months and was long and grueling. In fact, the Latin Crusaders were almost defeated on several different occasions. There are several other instances where the authors skim over characters and events in a way that does them absolutely no justice. One in particular: there are 5 accounts of Pope Urban II's speech at Clermont (some written over 100 years after the fact) that called for the First Crusade. The Caners seem to jump freely between the 5 accounts and quote them at random whenever it it convenient to make their point without clarifying whose account they are drawing from.If you are looking for a better (though not perfect), readable overview of the Crusades, Jonathan Phillips' Holy Warriors is much more carefully researched. This book isn't clearly biased or politically motivated. It is just bad history.

  • Dianna
    2018-10-17 23:35

    This is an interesting book that points out the evil heart of man - to kill in the name of God is a sin no matter who does it. The authors put a lot of thought and research into this book and I appreciated everything I learned - even though it is heartbreaking. It's still history and it's still the truth. That's what makes it heartbreaking.

  • Rick
    2018-10-13 04:28

    This is a must read for Christians. It gives a comprehensive history of the attitudes of Christians toward violence and war through the Crusades and to the present age. It is very instructive and very helpful to understand Middle Eastern attitudes toward the US and war.

  • Shane
    2018-09-23 00:26

    This book gives a very sober review of the negative parts of Christian history, mainly the Crusades and the Inquisition and how they are still effecting the Christian witness today.