Read Freud's Blind Spot: 23 Original Essays on Cherished, Estranged, Lost, Hurtful, Hopeful, Complicated Siblings by Elisa Albert Online

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Relationships with our siblings stretch, as an old saying has it, all the way from the cradle to the grave. Few bonds in life are as significant, as formative, as lasting, and as frequently overlooked as those we share with our brothers and sisters. In this stellar, first-of-its-kind anthology, contemporary writers explore the rich and varied landscape of sibling experiencRelationships with our siblings stretch, as an old saying has it, all the way from the cradle to the grave. Few bonds in life are as significant, as formative, as lasting, and as frequently overlooked as those we share with our brothers and sisters. In this stellar, first-of-its-kind anthology, contemporary writers explore the rich and varied landscape of sibling experience, illuminating the essential, occasionally wonderful, often difficult ways our brothers and sisters—or lack thereof—shape us. There are those who love and cherish their siblings, those who abhor and avoid them, and everyone in between....

Title : Freud's Blind Spot: 23 Original Essays on Cherished, Estranged, Lost, Hurtful, Hopeful, Complicated Siblings
Author :
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ISBN : 9781439198810
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 288 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Freud's Blind Spot: 23 Original Essays on Cherished, Estranged, Lost, Hurtful, Hopeful, Complicated Siblings Reviews

  • Emily
    2018-08-18 01:04

    “The story of my siblings is the story of who I am.”–Nellie HermannI first picked up this book after reading a review of it because siblings, as you may well know, are complicated. A few weeks ago I was at a benefit, sipping an African inspired cocktail and talking to a friend of a friend about siblings. “We’re actually complete opposites,” he said about his sister, and I nodded my head in understanding. “It’s amazing to me how siblings can come from the same place [womb, gene pool] and be so fundamentally different,” I said. “I have three siblings.” I raised three of my fingers like a fan between us. “And we are like four corners. As far apart as four people can be and still be together.” I was kind of drunk. Anyone who knows me knows that it wasn’t always this way between my siblings, but it is now. And, well, that’s all I’m going to say about that.What I appreciated the most about this book, and what I believed it carried off most successfully, was its consideration of the complicated and phenomenal relationships between siblings. At last month’s book club, while discussing Freedom, one person spoke of Patty and Walter’s relationship as being understandably up and down. “They say that you are never more cruel to anyone than you are to your spouse, and also never more lovely.” I smiled when she said that and found myself looking forward to the day when I would have someone in my life that I could love and abuse, sometimes simultaneously. It must be the back and forth and up and down that comes from living with someone for years, decades even, I thought at the time. I found myself considering her comment while reading Freud’s Blind Spot and thinking about how the relationships between siblings may be the closest thing to the relationships between spouses. And here is why: in our lives, there is no single person that we will live with, get to know, fight with, and consequently love as we do our siblings and our spouses. Your parents, one could argue, but they’re your parents not your peers. (See Freud for more on this tangled dynamic.) And who else knows more about you—your life, your upbringing—than your siblings? Who else knows about the summer you made up a fake boyfriend named Bo Stimpkin just so that you could feel less like the chubby loser with a boy haircut that you were? It makes sense to me then that the path a sibling relationship can take will be as fraught and fragile as one between spouses. Just as some marriages end in divorce, separation, bliss, or ambivalence, so, too, can the relationships with our siblings. Time can do amazing things to unite people; it can also tear them apart.I can’t speak about marriage, but I can speak about siblings: no one can hurt me more than my siblings, and—miraculously, wonderfully—I can forgive no one faster than them either. Whether it was through stories of violent brothers, new siblings, disabled siblings, bonding during divorce, bonding during death, bonding during infidelity, half-siblings, stepsiblings, sibling rivalry, transgender siblings, adopted siblings, and the death of a sibling, this book succeeds. Perhaps what makes this collection of essays so successful is how varied the relationships are that it describes. We may not all have half-siblings or gay siblings or racially diverse siblings, but something about gathering all of these types of relationships into one collection feels like the only way to come close to representing the complicated, convoluted, painful, lovely relationships between brothers and sisters.

  • Iva
    2018-08-02 23:56

    Editor Elisa Albert calls siblings "central actors in the drama of our lives". The writers in this collection of personal essays are mostly poets and fiction writers. It is a creative and solid gathering of provocative perspectives on brothers and sisters and often half brothers and sisters and of course the parents and step-parents, good and bad. Two essays use a question and answer format and this was a very revealing and effective method of sharing memories. I discovered some new authors and learned something about how much influence siblings have on one's life.

  • Leah
    2018-08-03 04:54

    some essays were much better than others obviously but very interesting over all

  • Shelley
    2018-08-18 01:46

    Nice compilation of various forms of sibling relationships, the negative and positive. I liked the topic of examining sibling relationships but found no dramatic nor dysfunctional as I perceive my own to be. Early death of a parent, or death of a parent in general were themes in some, how devastating it can be to latent family problems, bringing them to the forefront and stressing the remaining ties, creating dynamics throughout the rest of the years. I found some of the stories to be a bit lonely, only children who then had a foster or adopted special needs sibling arrive. And other essays were written in unusual form, with letters back and forth between two brothers. The title is excellent, though a bit deceiving because there is no psychodynamic or psychanalytic reference to any of the stories, and only one seemed to reference incestuous tendencies, sexuality in any form that Freud was preoccupied with. Freud himself was reference and I learned from further checking that his concepts were truly projection from his own disturbed family interactions. I wish the book was more comprehensive about how parents influence the siblings and how individual siblings and effectively drive a wedge in relationships of other siblings. Big families were a bit left out.

  • Robert
    2018-07-20 22:58

    A significant portion of these 23 essays about sibling-hood are earnest paeans, some of which seem to say little more than "Wow, my brother/sister is so totally awesome!" At one point I entertained the notion of abandoning this for something a little kickier, but in the end I persevered and ultimately feel it was an overall worthwhile read. Among the highlights: "Burning Questions," a lively, funny back-and-forth between Jill and Faith Soloway,both of whom impressed me as refreshingly blunt and scatological yet warm and loving; "Islanders," a typically beautiful, witty graphic narrative by Eric Orner set in the 70's during the weekend his parents announced to him and his younger brother their divorce; the meditative "Dyke Bridge" by Eric's brother, Peter Orner; the sweetly funny "Tickle or Torture" by Vestal McIntyre, and "Ultra-Orthodox Sister" by Etgar Keret. The opening piece by Steve Almond, "The Brothers Grim" and the engaging, slapsticky "The Roof Beneath Our Feet" by Jay Baron Nicorvo round things out in the Thumbs Up Way Up department. Basically, I went for the funny more than the heartstrings here. Final score: 2 1/2 to 3 out of 5.

  • Sarah
    2018-08-17 21:57

    I absolutely loved this book! I am not one for reviewing books, why I'm not sure, but nonetheless I'm not, but it has been a long time since I have felt so connected to a book. Albert's idea of having 24 authors write about their relationships with siblings is completely ingenious. I have always talked about the importance of my relationship with both my siblings, which I might add is an absolutely wonderful relationship, and yet it seems too often be something that is forgotten by most people. There were only two of the stories that I really did not enjoy, but for reading 24 authors and 1 editor all within one book I by no means feel sad about that. This is a book that I would recommend to everyone and as a high school English teacher I think it would be a great non-fiction writing assignment for my kids. Just, absolutely wonderful!!!!

  • Kate
    2018-08-16 05:08

    I loved this book. It made me really reflect on my relationships with my siblings. You can read a review I wrote of the book at BookGeeks.co.uk.

  • Michelle
    2018-07-22 03:10

    Checked this out at the library after searching their collection for Lauren Grodstein. Good variety in these essays. although the subject matter--slibings--gets a bit repetitive. Could've been maybe 50 pages shorter.

  • Rick Rofihe
    2018-08-01 03:45

    http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/...

  • Jasmine
    2018-08-05 03:05

    3.5 starsI really enjoyed a few of these essays, but found many of them to be just "meh."

  • Jasmine
    2018-08-13 05:12

    3.5 stars