Read Portland Queer: Tales of the Rose City by Ariel Gore Marc Acito Kathleen Bryson Ariel Gore Annie Murphy Sarah Dougher Jacob Anderson-Minshall Dexter Flowers Online

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At once a love letter to the Rose City and a dream of escape, the first-person narratives of Portland Queer reveal the contradictions and commonalities of life in one of the world’s great queer meccas. A waiter falls in love with a straight guy from the café next door. A young dyke discovers gay karaoke at the Silverado. A pregnant man prepares for new life transitions. AnAt once a love letter to the Rose City and a dream of escape, the first-person narratives of Portland Queer reveal the contradictions and commonalities of life in one of the world’s great queer meccas. A waiter falls in love with a straight guy from the café next door. A young dyke discovers gay karaoke at the Silverado. A pregnant man prepares for new life transitions. An ambitious teenager finds her tribe at St. Mary’s Academy. A closet-case is confronted by his wife. And a video-game addict takes a chance on love....

Title : Portland Queer: Tales of the Rose City
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781934620656
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 256 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Portland Queer: Tales of the Rose City Reviews

  • Elevate Difference
    2018-10-10 21:17

    Portland Queer: Tales of the Rose City is a mixed collection of memoir and fiction short stories that center on the city of Portland, OR. All of the stories are written in first person narrative and beautifully display the diversity of the human experiences which only a city like Portland can provide the backdrop. These stories provide readers with a view of the city that may not have been available before this collection was published. Each tome represents a different view of life in the city as it is lived by the LGBTQI population that calls Portland home. Portland has long been a mecca for the LGBTQI masses and this collection of stories celebrates the many reasons why this is the case.Editor Ariel Gore wanted readers to know that, “Portland is a queer magnet...and Portland is alienating and phobic...Within these contradictions, there’s also a common experience. In a world that tries to divide us further and further from each other, I want to see our threads woven together.” Gore brings together a collection of stories and raw human experiences, reminding her readers that we are all fragile beings who seek out connections with each other and find comfort in place. For these authors that place is Portland.The book is broken up into four sections—“Love and Other Sad, Sparkly Things,” “Migrations,” “For Service and Devotion,” “Then Sometimes this Feeling of Home”—and each contains several stories. The first deals with several versions of love and how love can catch us off guard. The second section is composed of stories about leaving and returning to the Rose City, while the third and fourth sections contain stories of living and working in the city.There are several prominent writers featured in this collection, as well as several first-time writers, which helps to present the variety of styles and viewpoints. Those who have a short attention span, as I do will enjoy the variety contained in these short stories. They're enough to keep anyone in need of good literature who is short on time happy.Review by Jenny Greenfield

  • Kevin
    2018-09-25 20:21

    Includes great new stories by Tom Spanbauer, Megan Kruse, and Sarah Dougher. Edited by the invincible Ariel Gore.

  • corinne
    2018-10-12 03:02

    I was real excited to scoot on over to In Other Words and buy this book. Queer and Portland - yes! As with most collections, I was more interested in some of the pieces over others - but felt that there was some interesting diversity of voices in the collection. I would have loved it if there was more of a presence of queers of color in the book, a story or two that addressed the experience of living as a queer of color in a community that is predominantly white queers. Maybe in the next collection?Unfortunately, my book fell entirely apart. The glue in the binding came totally undone and now one must read it page by page.

  • Mike
    2018-10-05 21:15

    Nice collection of short stories. If you don't live in Portland or have no interest in the city, you might want to pass the book over or at least be selective of the stories cause some aren't quite "literature." I think "Chinook" is an excellent story and would recommend it to anyone, anywhere.

  • Chloe
    2018-10-02 22:12

    I really liked reading these short stories and recognizing all the local haunts and neighborhoods. My favorite story was by Michael Sage Ricci, about dating in the online gaming world. I also really liked "Will the Circle Be Unbroken" by Donal Mosher, and this line describing the scene at a bar: "An expression of tawdry confidence gains strength as it's met and reflected."A few stories I didn't really understand, but for the most part, I'd recommend this book to my Portland peeps!

  • Lauren
    2018-09-24 01:16

    I know I should give this book more stars - it's about portland, it's about queers, it has authors I really like who contribute. But really I was kind of let down by almost every story in this book.

  • Liza
    2018-10-18 21:08

    Ummm bought this out of Portland nostalgia, liked it because it has a story by Sarah Dougher. Recommended to others with Portland nostalgia, probably not anyone else.

  • Yen
    2018-10-06 21:13

    Loved all the great stories in here.

  • Matt Frear
    2018-10-17 00:07

    Not a bad anthology - some tales better than others and none stand out as excellent. Worth reading though for a taste of the sheer variety of gay and lesbian life in PDX.

  • Julia P
    2018-10-19 19:11

    I still don't understand this format?

  • Elizabeth
    2018-10-16 03:26

    omg