Read Moondyne by John Boyle O'Reilly Online

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John Boyle OaReilly (1844-1890) was an Irish-born poet and novelist. As a youth in Ireland he was a member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood, for which crime he was transported to Western Australia. After escaping to the United States, he became a prominent spokesperson for Irish sentiment and culture, through his editorship of the Boston newspaper The Pilot, his prolifiJohn Boyle OaReilly (1844-1890) was an Irish-born poet and novelist. As a youth in Ireland he was a member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood, for which crime he was transported to Western Australia. After escaping to the United States, he became a prominent spokesperson for Irish sentiment and culture, through his editorship of the Boston newspaper The Pilot, his prolific writing, and his lecture tours. OaReilly published his first book of poems, Songs from the Southern Seas, in 1873. Over the next fifteen years, he would publish another three collections of poetry, a novel, and a treatise on health and exercise. His poetry was extremely popular at the time, and he was often commissioned to write poems for important and commemorative occasions. Most of his earlier work is nowadays dismissed as mere popular verse, but some of his later, more introspective poetry, such as his best known poem The Cry of the Dreamer, is still highly regarded. Amongst his other works are: Moondyne (1879), Songs, Legends, and Ballads (1878) and The Kingas Men: A Tale of To-morrow (with others) (1884)....

Title : Moondyne
Author :
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ISBN : 9781409917489
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 344 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Moondyne Reviews

  • Bettie☯
    2019-06-25 04:21

    A novel based on his experiences as a convict in Western Australia opening: THE GOLD MINE OF THE VASSE.THE LAND OF THE RED LINEWESTERN AUSTRALIA is a vast and unknown country, almost mysterious in its solitude and unlikeness to any other part of the earth. It is the greatest of the Australias in extent, and in many features the richest and loveliest.But the sister colonies of Victoria, New South Wales, and Queensland are famous for their treasure of gold. Men from all lands have flockedthither to gather riches. They care not for the slow labour of the farmer or grazier. Let the weak and the old, the coward and the dreamer, prune the vine and dry the figs, and wait for the wheat to ripen. Strong men must go to the trial--must set muscle against muscle, and brain against brain, in the mine and the market.Men's lives are short; and unless they gather gold in the mass, how shall they wipe out the primal curse of poverty before the hand loses its skill and the heart its strong desire?http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0602...Somewhat over-rendered but that's what is alluring about Victorian writings. This is a fictional account of his escape from Australia and I couldn't recommend it. A better book is Keanally's The Great Shame.

  • Ric
    2019-07-08 04:12

    I was looking for a novel from 1879 to read (don’t ask me why) and I was having terrible trouble. I had a go at George Meredith’s The Egoist, but that was too much for me, so I continued sifting through book sites on the web until I came across Moondyne by John Boyle O’Reilly. I was taken with the title and when I found out That O’Reilly had been a convict transported to a penal colony in Western Australia… how could I resist.The novel was OK, but never reached astounding heights. It was just a little over-melodramatic, even for a 19C novel. It is semi-autobiographical and has much to say about the evils of transportation and the whole 19th century criminal justice system. In this it reminded me somewhat of Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables (although the two are not comparable in their quality of writing). In Les Miserables Jean Valjean is the convict that shakes off his chains to become a valued member of society; in Moondyne, it is the bushranger Moondyne who does the same. Both are noble men blighted by circumstance and society. In Les Miserables there is the romance of Marius and Cosette; in Moondyne the romance is between Alice Walmsley and Australian property owner Will Sheridan.Moondyne is steeped in Australiana, from wonderful descriptions of the Western Australian bush to the interaction of the European settlers with the aboriginal inhabitants; the novel even finishes with a Bush fire disaster – a topic of recent interest in modern day Australia.So I had decided that John Boyle O’Reilly was dinkum and that Moondyne could be added to my growing list of Australian novels … except… O’Reilly was born in Ireland, was transported as a political prisoner after the British quelling of the uprising of the Irish Republican Brotherhood, or Fenians of which he was a member, escaped from Australia a couple of years later and settled among the Irish of Boston in the USA. He would have been a resident of the US when he wrote Moondyne. Boyle was more famous for his poetry that his prose. It is purported that O’Reilly was President John F. Kennedy’s favourite poet. The Irish rock band U2 dedicated their song Van Diemen's Land on their album Rattle and Hum (1988) to O'Reilly.But because he was of convict stock, he’s as true blue as the Southern Cross and will remain in my collection of Aussie authors.

  • Ryan
    2019-07-11 06:10

    John Boyle O'Reilly was one of the many Irish Republican Brotherhood members transported to Australia, and his story is part of Keanally's The Great Shame. He eventually escaped and ended up in Boston where he was an editor, writer, poet and participated in intellectual societies. Moondyne is supposed to be based on his experiences in his Australia prison.The story is somewhere between the Count of Monte Cristo and Great Expectations, though more tragic than either, and possibly more romantic too. The attitude toward the aboriginals was possibly more enlightened than most, though still colonial. Not a bad story - a bit too much angst and drama, even for me. But certainly worth reading after reading The Great Shame.

  • John
    2019-07-06 05:06

    The story written by an Irish patriot who himself was sent to the Australian penal colonies in his youth. While the phrasing is a bit stilted the author shows his personal experiences in the shipload of convicts sent to Australia and the brutal conditions that they lived under. His protagonist, an escaped convict, goes into the bush and through hard work and native intelligence becomes a wealthy landowner via his efforts and then turns to reforming the harsh penal code in both UK and Australia!Interspersed is a love affair thwarted by an evil personage that takes years across continents to arrive at a happy solution.

  • Beaugiejuice
    2019-06-30 12:18

    Pretty cool book considering when it was written. A lot of references to places to which I'm very familiar with and kind of think is funny.