Read The Gryphon: In Which the Extraordinary Correspondence of Griffin & Sabine Is Rediscovered by Nick Bantock Online

the-gryphon-in-which-the-extraordinary-correspondence-of-griffin-sabine-is-rediscovered

Isabella:The parcel did contain something unusual...65 cards and letters, the massed correspondence between Sabine and a man called Griffin Moss. It's odd stuff. I'm trying to decide if I've encountered an elaborate fiction, or a series of events that, if true, cast doubt over any concept of reality I've ever held.--MatthewThe correspondence of Griffin Moss and Sabine StroIsabella:The parcel did contain something unusual...65 cards and letters, the massed correspondence between Sabine and a man called Griffin Moss. It's odd stuff. I'm trying to decide if I've encountered an elaborate fiction, or a series of events that, if true, cast doubt over any concept of reality I've ever held.--MatthewThe correspondence of Griffin Moss and Sabine Strohem, at turns enigmatic, sumptuous, and romantic, reveals dangerous undercurrents and strange forces at work in the universe. These powers have only grown stronger with the couple's disappearance. Nothing is heard from them for quite some time, until Sabine asks Matthew Sedon, a young archaeologist working in Egypt, for help. As Matthew is reluctantly drawn into the intrigue, he finds encouragement from his strong-willed girlfriend, Isabella de Reims. Miles away in Paris, Isabella struggles with haunting glimpses of mythic landscapes and surreal creatures that come to her in waking dreams. Slowly Matthew and Isabella realize that to unlock this secret world is to open the door to their deepest yearnings. Author and artist Nick Bantock tells a story like no other: As you pull handwritten letters from stamped envelopes, the enchanting world of The Gryphon literally unfolds in your hands as it takes root in your imagination....

Title : The Gryphon: In Which the Extraordinary Correspondence of Griffin & Sabine Is Rediscovered
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780811831628
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 58 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Gryphon: In Which the Extraordinary Correspondence of Griffin & Sabine Is Rediscovered Reviews

  • Mahinn
    2018-12-27 01:56

    There are many ways to perceive books and review them. But there aren't many books that are anything like the Griffin & Sabine trilogy. I don't believe one can apply the same critiques to this mystical, magical realm of literature. For this is not only one story. Rather, these are stories within stories. And if one were to think of it, so is life. Stories within stories with no real sense of an end. There is a reason for that also - an ending is merely our perception of where things stand. However, if one were to be so brave as to imagine that nothing ever truly begins nor, consequently need to end, we cease looking for a linear structure to the books we read and love, or to life. My suggestion is this: do not look for the mundane. You will find it. Wait for nothing. Everything reveals itself. And do not expect the unexpected. You are ruining your own surprise. Float. Sink. Let go. And you will fall in love with this book.

  • Allegra S
    2018-12-30 04:07

    So this is the 1st book of the second trilogy... I really enjoyed it, I can't believe I actually own a copy autographed by the creative genius himself.I have to say that I like the mystery, but I'm not really into symbols or mythology so that part of the book is kind of lost on me. I think that would be better left to another one of our favourite fictional characters: Robert Langdon. (ha ha)My only complaint is that I really can't figure out if Sabine is evil or these people are all crazy or something. I mean, (spoiler alert), in the very first book I was totally creeped out by Sabine, especially at the ending because of the lack of stamps/postage/address... all that. And Griffin just seems so vulnerable. I came around on Sabine in the second two books, but by the beginning of the Gryphon/end of the Golden Mean, she totally creeps me out again with the postcard she sends to Matthew. Where is Griffin?? I keep thinking either she is a mass murderer, or that this really is a mystical symbolic book and she and Griffin really have become the same person. I am worried for Griffin because if this isn't some big symbology story, he "reappears" in the middle of the Gryphon, but his handwriting is Sabine's..... And by the end of the book I'm back on the original side of the fence with Sabine totally creeping me out again. Maybe the whole plot with Frolotti was just so she could murder Griffin?? She does have a temper (aka "foolish man. you cannot turn me into a phantom just because you are frightened.")My final bet really is that Griffin is crazy and these people are all an invention of his mind.I guess I shall just have to get the 2nd two books of the 2nd trilogy and figure it all out. (But knowing Nick Bantock, there won't really be an ending to all this.)

  • Melynna
    2019-01-06 01:50

    While the artwork continues to be great and the format enchanting, these last three make me impatient for the end. They got weirder and not in a way I enjoyed. Also, I found it frustrating that all of these "love letters" are filled with what appears to be lust and little more. Okay, that was maybe too harsh, but I did want more talk about the meat of why they loved each other instead of the anticipation or remembrance of sex or being physically together.

  • Shandra
    2019-01-07 23:06

    I was delighted to rediscover the world of Griffin and Sabine! I either didn't realize or forgot that there was a second trilogy, as I'd never read it. I remember reading the first trilogy back in the early 2000s, not long after starting at the library. There's just something really cool about reading a book made of postcards, and actual letters that you remove from little envelopes! You also have to carefully examine the art, as that's part of the story, and it's very intriguing. The details of the original trilogy are hazy after all this time, but it started to come back to me as I read this book, and we get to meet two new characters, Matthew and Isabella. I was just starting to really get into the story when the first book ended, and I'm glad I have access to the second one right away! (I definitely recommend starting with the original trilogy, if you can get your hands on it.)

  • Jennifer (the_pumpkin_reads)
    2019-01-22 00:49

    We come back to Griffin and Sabine guiding another couple of lovers down a path that doesn't seem to quite mesh with reality as we known it.These impeccably detailed books are works of art.

  • Amber Ditullio
    2019-01-05 19:54

    (Note: This review covers all three books in the series - The Gryphon, Alexandria and The Morning Star.)The Morning Star Trilogy is the second trilogy of books regarding Griffin and Sabine. But this time, Griffin and Sabine are in the background, guiding another pair of lovers together in an effort to stop Frolatti from some horrible plot. In the forefront of this story are Matthew Sedon, a young archaeologist in Alexandria with a connection to Sabine (she helped deliver him) and Isabella de Reims, a student in Paris and Matthew's lover. Isabella often has waking dreams, views into the psyche of the world. The letters are primarily between Matthew and Isabella, though Sabine does contact Matthew on occasion and Griffin keeps in contact with Isabella. There are shades of the beginnings of Griffin and Sabine's romance within these correspondence - primarily with Matthew's doubts regarding Sabine.Unlike the previous trilogy, there is more of a sense of menace with this trilogy. There is active evil in the unseen Frilotti and his cohorts. But getting Matthew to understand the seriousness of what is happening (within the first book) is a large part of the first book.I'll be honest. The second trilogy fell flat with me. It still had the beautiful artwork of the first trilogy, but the magic wasn't quite there. I think the addition of "the next generation" just didn't work as well. My husband, of course, thinks I'm crazy as he loved them as much as the first trilogy. But for me, Griffin and Sabine had a simplicity beneath the complications of their circumstance. Something primal about the connection and the love they shared. But adding Matthew and Isabella complicated that. And it just didn't sit as right with me.The series was ok... worth reading at least once. But it didn't, in my mind, live up to the magic of the first trilogy.

  • D.M.
    2018-12-27 21:59

    I can only imagine the subtitle to this fourth book in the Griffin & Sabine 'trilogy' should read, 'In Which Daddy Needs a New Pair of Shoes.' This just feels more like an unnecessary addition than the previous two, as those were at least kind of wrapping up the mystery of what was going on between the correspondents. This one takes its lead from the quizzical final postcard of The Golden Mean, and spins it into a new correspondence. Now, it's chiefly between Matthew Sedon in Egypt and his (fairly new) lover Isabella de Reims in Paris, but there's Griffin & Sabine in there writing to both of the above about some connection they share. The nature of the connection isn't made explicit, but Matthew's birth was witnessed by Sabine and Isabella has 'waking dreams,' so it seems like it must be similar to that between Griffin & Sabine. It's likewise not clarified how Sabine first gets Matthew's address while he's in Kenya, but I suppose nitpicking like that really has no place in such a vague and mystical story.The letters between Matthew and Isabella are genuinely charming, and read like those which might genuinely pass between two ardent, new lovers with geography separating them. Those from Griffin & Sabine, to either party, are so outlandishly strange that they would seem to have been written by Bantock on a bender, assuming that he'd fix it all when he designed the postcards & envelopes.The art this time around is much more simple and traditional on the whole, mainly because the core correspondence is not between artists but between an archaeologist and a zoologist (?). So, if it's not Griffin or Sabine writing, the cards are basically what you might expect produced for actual postcarding, often like ones from a flea market (as Isabella states hers are).Everything here seems taken down a notch except the strangeness. That is amped up to 11, and the ending of the book brings no kind of end at all. I suppose when this came out, Bantock already knew he was on board for at least one more. Personally, he could have stopped before this, but we'll see what Alexandria offers.

  • Susan Liston
    2018-12-31 23:54

    This review covers all three books in the second Griffin and Sabine trilogy.I received the first trilogy as a gift, and I enjoyed it. When I was told there were three more books, I rushed to get them. But, although they had the same physical beauty and fun of the first set, the story sort of bogged down. I thought the magic spark and spooky intrigue pretty much vanished. I was just confused and that is annoying....is the author deliberately being obscure or am I just stupid? Either way, I didn't see the point of adding two new characters without explaining what really has happened with Sabine and Griffin. ( Although in posting this I have discovered that there is now a seventh book that takes place in between the trilogies and possibly does shed some light on what happened after the third book. Or maybe I'll just become MORE confused.) I really didn't mind that the original trilogy ended in mystery because it was such a simple tale. That was fine to let your own imagination end it as you wish. But when you start throwing in visions and Egyptian gods and ancient statues and stalking bad guys and arson and whatever you have a different kind of story and I need more sense made of it.

  • Hollie Barnes
    2019-01-18 21:11

    After reading this triology (this review is based on the 3 books: The Gryphon, Alexandria and The Morning Star) Ive come to appreciate the simplicity of the original triology (Griffin & Sabine.) I admit that I got annoyed that new characters were introduced and I was more interested in finding out what happened with Griffin & Sabine. But, as I got into the books, I was able to see G&S come out alongside with Matthew and Isabella. Mr. Bantock is a huge fan of Greek/Egytpian mythology and metaphysical concepts. He absolutely ran with these mystical, alluring concepts in the final triology. These books are not for the average person; they're better suited for people who like mysteries, the allure of unknown, enchanted love stories and odd mystical mythologies. I was interested in doing some research on Mercury, Hermes, Thoth and a few other Egyptian dieties after reading these books. After reading up on a few stories and concepts on these individuals, I was able to better understand the general concept of the entire series. Its definitely very metaphysical and philosphical. I have to say that I absolutely love the format of the books. The letters, postcards and paper trinkets are absolutely charming and really make the books.

  • Camilla
    2018-12-30 21:06

    I have no idea how to review this.. I mean, the 3rd book kinda had an end, even though it was an end where you would have to use your imagination to guess what/who Sabine and Griffin were, and where they were.Now, I've read this and really have no idea what to think? I mean, now we read about 'dark angels, shadow-seeing' and what not? I hope the last two books give some kind of explanation.. Even though I'm not really counting on it..

  • Jamie
    2019-01-08 22:48

    It's a good thing there are three more books to help reveal the mystery that started with "Griffin & Sabine," since I was not satisfied with the end of the first trilogy. "The Gryphon" incorporates a new couple into the cryptic and increasingly dangerous fold of the original correspondents in a visually stunning and emotionally engaging way.

  • Rose
    2019-01-10 23:45

    enough already. killing the magic.

  • Margi
    2019-01-09 19:47

    Griffin and Sabine have disappeared and suddenly Sabine appears and asks for help from and archeologist in Egypt. This book is filled with danger and strange forces. Matthew and Isabella must unlock the secret world they have become a part of.

  • Diana Prince
    2019-01-12 22:02

    I discovered this at a friend's house and immediately devoured it. I haven't had the chance to finish the rest of the Griffin and Sabine trilogy, but I still heartily read this addition to the series as a whole and can't wait to hear more from these characters and their enigmatic story.

  • Amy
    2018-12-26 19:50

    The mystery from the first trilogy, that began with Griffin and Sabine, continues. Some time has passed, and two new characters have been brought in on the correspondence. Just not sure if this is going anywhere??

  • Kristen
    2019-01-13 01:45

    I hope the end of this series has answers, lol.

  • Edwina Callan
    2018-12-25 01:55

    These books are like a drug ... and I am addicted.Need more now!

  • Heather
    2019-01-23 21:12

    Unintentionally read this one out of order. But it's still fantastic, and The Golden Mean is on its way to me. I will tackle the final two books in the series in 2017.

  • Allison
    2018-12-29 21:47

    Another incredible journey with the mysterious and seductive Griffin & Sabine. I can never get enough!

  • Laura (booksnob)
    2019-01-02 01:49

    These books do not fit in a category. They are wonderful and I'm so happy to continue reading the saga of Griffin and Sabine.

  • Mary
    2019-01-24 03:10

    I did not like the art in this one as well as the original trilogy, but the story was much easier to follow and I liked that very much.

  • Lynn
    2019-01-13 02:09

    Today's post is on The Gryphon by Nick Bantock. It is the first in the Morning Star series. The cover is green with a beautiful golden postcard in the center. It is 58 pages long and is published by Chronicle Books. The intended reader is someone who has read the first trilogy, likes reading other people's mail, and magic. There is no langauge, no sex, and no voilence in this book. There Be Spoilers Ahead.From the dust jacket- Isabella:The parcel did contain something unusual...65 cards and letters, the massed correspondence between Sabine and a man called Griffin Moss. It's odd stuff. I'm trying to decide if I've encountered an elaborate fiction, or a series of events that, if true, cast doubt over any concept of reality I've ever held.--MatthewThe correspondence of Griffin Moss and Sabine Strohem, at turns enigmatic, sumptuous, and romantic, reveals dangerous undercurrents and strange forces at work in the universe. These powers have only grown stronger with the couple's disappearance. Nothing is heard from them for quite some time, until Sabine asks Matthew Sedon, a young archaeologist working in Egypt, for help. As Matthew is reluctantly drawn into the intrigue, he finds encouragement from his strong-willed girlfriend, Isabella de Reims. Miles away in Paris, Isabella struggles with haunting glimpses of mythic landscapes and surreal creatures that come to her in waking dreams. Slowly Matthew and Isabella realize that to unlock this secret world is to open the door to their deepest yearnings. Review- More magical letters and love stories. The story is taking a broader perspective for this whole trilogy. Isabella is special but she, and we as the readers, do not know how. Sabine contacts Matthew because she was the midwife at his birth. So they have a connection. Griffin and Sabine are now beyond the villains grasp but they are still concerned with the world they left behind. To help Isabella do whatever she is to do they reach out to Isabella and Matthew. The art, as usual, is wonderful and adds so much to the story. The fantasy elements are stronger in this volume and I cannot wait to see how things are going to grow and change.I give this book a Five out of Five stars. I get nothing for my review and I bought this book with my own money.

  • Margot
    2019-01-02 22:46

    In this second Griffin and Sabine trilogy, Griffin and Sabine have escaped to another dimension together (or something) and are now corresponding back into the regular world to illicit help from a young couple who are corresponding with each other to maintain their long-distance relationship.I haven't been too excited about the G&S books since the first two. This one is much the same same, although I do like the art a bit more in this installment than in #3, The Golden Mean. And this new tale raises interesting story questions. As usual, Sabine comes on too strong and comes off a bit creepy at the end of this. On the whole, I found the dialogue vague and overly-dramatized. Just freaking say what you mean or stop writing letters. I can really see how I was influenced in my own writing, as a kid, by these books. I recall several talking-head dialogues I wrote that were completely philosophical and nearly incomprehensible in their vagueries. The Gryphon is not too far off from that.

  • A.
    2018-12-29 21:09

    (The same review is posted for all 3 books in the 2nd Griffin & Sabine trilogy -- the Morning Star trilogy.)In this series, we meet Isabella and Matthew, whose lives seem to echo Griffin & Sabine's in some ways and who seem to be drawn into this sort of supernatural struggle with Griffin & Sabine and the sinister villain who is doing whatever he can to change the course of their lives. I don't know why, I just didn't like these as much. I didn't like Isabella and Matthew's story as much as Griffin and Sabine's - I felt it was too contrived. And I didn't particularly enjoy Griffin & Sabine's involvement in Matthew & Isabella's story either. I just didn't. But I will say, that if you're mushy gushy and like a little sex-talk in your postcards, this will probably appeal to you :) Other than that, I thought it was OK and I was eager to keep reading, but they weren't my favorites. If I were to recommend Bantock's books, I would probably recommend the original trilogy & the 7th book (The Pharos Gate).This book - 3 and a half stars; the series as a whole, 3 stars.

  • Bexa
    2019-01-19 00:11

    This is the first one of his I read, not realizing it was out of order, but was still entertaining enough and a unique enough story all on its own that I got pulled in and enthralled by the artwork and the writing. Is it bad that I want a book that provides more in depth discussion than what is provided. This series starts a second set of letters/postcards between Matthew and Isabella, people that met briefly and has a passionate few weeks together, but then became separated because of work and school. Isabella has a almost dead computer and so their only communication can be by writing, and she also suffers from an interesting case of what Sabine seems to have. Sabine has contact Matthew in hopes that he can help her and Griffin, as they are still hiding away, protected from the crazed man. I hope this continues to be as good as it is, I'm massively enjoying this series.

  • Hotavio
    2019-01-12 02:54

    The books in this series are like candy bars. They're short and pleasurable and delicious, but are never meant for a meal. This is why I would never read more than one in a row off the bat. That being said,The Gryphonis one of the better ones because it pulls shines it spotlight on a few more characters, namely archeologist Matthew Sedon and student Isabella De Reims. The original epistolary lovers have zeroed in on the long distance relationship which bears an uncanny resemblance to their own. Readers try to make sense of the vague writings from Sabine as the two lovers are ripped from their ordinary life and plunged into a deeper but mysterious love. As usual, the art and photography is fascinating and as baffling as the letters themselves, with much of it taking on themes and utilizing reoccuring symbols. This book was more stiking than its predecessors.

  • Michelle
    2018-12-28 00:49

    This is the first book in the 2nd Griffin and Sabine trilogy. We meet Matthew, to whom Sabine wrote a postcard to in the last book (The Golden Mean). We also meet his love, Isabelle. They are in a long distance relationship, with Matthew being an archeologist. Matthew receives Griffin and Sabine's correspondence and the two newcomers work on discovering if these two are real or if this is a hoax. When Isabella begins receiving correspondence from Griffin things become more intense and the mystery evolves. While I picked up this series to find out what happened to Griffin and Sabine, I found myself becoming intrigued by the two new characters and the parallels between their relationship and those of Griffin and Sabine. The book's plot keeps your interest and the artwork on the letters continues to be amazing. I can't wait to read the next installment to see what will happen.

  • Taro Yamashita
    2018-12-23 19:55

    This starts the second trilogy. Based on the intriguing concept presented in the original trilogy, this tries too much to reach back into the beautiful,magical thing, and re-use the concepts. It does not work nearly as well as I had hoped.Visually, this is just as stunning and wonderful as the original trilogy. The format is the same, but the characters are more developed. However, the magic is gone. I don't know how else to describe it, except that it feels something like the Sherlock Holmes mysteries after he came back after presumably being killed: Sir Doyle didn't have the same spark, so some of the magic was gone. Same for all of the books about Conan, the Barbarian, that were written by people chasing after Robert E. Howard's original series.Is it worth reading? Absolutely. It is only less wonderful because it is in the shadow of the original Griffin and Sabine trilogy.

  • Alexa
    2018-12-30 20:49

    Maybe it's because I have not read any of the books that precede this one, but I found The Gryphon dull and unintriguing. I liked the idea -- a book of postcards and envelopes with letters and pictures inside is completely magical. It's like a pop up book for adults. But I didn't feel the emotion between the characters (two of whom are supposed to be madly in love with one another), didn't feel the fear I imagine I was supposed to feel at the end, and didn't care to find out what happens in the next book, or even what happened before that led up to the events in this one. But I definitely had fun going through all the letters and opening Isabella and Matthew's mail. That was fun. I want a pop up epistolary novel. That would be awesome.

  • Emily
    2019-01-10 23:02

    So here is a spoiler for the previous book, The Golden Mean. The last letter in that book is the first letter in this one and I thought the series ended with The Golden Mean. While I found the story to be romantic, I also harbored some suspicion of Sabine and at the end, part of me thought that Griffin had been consumed and that Matthew was Sabine's new target. This book picks up and shows that not to be the case (probably). This start of a second trilogy introduces new characters in Matthew and Isabella but Sabine and Griffin are still present. Sabine is so stingy with details and any actual explanations I found myself somewhat frustrated but still intrigued enough to keep reading. Not as strong as the first books but probably still worth the read if you like the style.