Read Making Sense of It All: Pascal and the Meaning of Life by Thomas V. Morris Online

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An instructive and entertaining book that addresses basic life questions. Relating numerous personal anecdotes, incorporating, intriguing material from the films of Woody Allen and the journals of Leo Tolstoy, and using the writings of the seventeenth-century genius Blaise Pascal as a central guide, Morris explores the nature of faith, reason, and the meaning of life. HisAn instructive and entertaining book that addresses basic life questions. Relating numerous personal anecdotes, incorporating, intriguing material from the films of Woody Allen and the journals of Leo Tolstoy, and using the writings of the seventeenth-century genius Blaise Pascal as a central guide, Morris explores the nature of faith, reason, and the meaning of life. His lucid reflections provide fresh, fertile insights and perspectives for any thoughtful person journeying through life....

Title : Making Sense of It All: Pascal and the Meaning of Life
Author :
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ISBN : 9780802806529
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 224 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Making Sense of It All: Pascal and the Meaning of Life Reviews

  • Jon
    2019-06-22 01:39

    4-4.5 starshttps://mossjon314159.wordpress.com/2...

  • Paul ataua
    2019-06-17 22:57

    I'm giving four stars to anything that gives insight into Pascal's work. it is highly readable and informative. The Woody Allen bits and attempts to make it modern and jokey don't really add anything , but, other than that, it is a fairly clear and thoughtful attempt to make Pascal accessible. I liked how he dealt with Pascal's 'custom is our nature' and his 'hidden god'. Good.

  • Jon
    2019-05-28 03:38

    A few nights ago I watched the movie "Of Gods and Men," an award-winning French film about eight Trappist monks in Algeria in the 1990's, ministering to a local village, and threatened both by a band of young men with guns (Islamists? terrorists? thugs? bandits?) and by the local police/army.They are almost surely going to be killed by one side or the other, and there are intense discussions among them about what they should do. One kindly old monk remarks that he has just read in Pascal "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction." It was amazing to me the hear that when I was in the course of reading this book. Pascal was a brilliant mathematician (he more or less invented our modern mathematics of probability), a scientist,and a devout Catholic who on Nov. 23, 1654 had what was apparently a unitive vision of God, a life-altering experience. His Pensees are a classic of introspection, devotion, and philosophical speculation. Mostly he is known today for his famous "wager" on whether it is better to bet on the existence of God or the non-existence. Its implications are usually vastly oversimplified, as this book points out in fascinating detail. Thomas Morris was a professor of philosophy at Notre Dame, and is thus a very sympathetic interpreter of Pascal. His book is usually enlightening, but occasionally a bit simplistic (for example, he enthusiastically endorses C.S. Lewis's "Trilemma"[there's a good article on it in Wikipedia] which even 30 years ago when I first encountered it I thought was pretty naive. Most modern theologians have had the same reaction.)But Morris has a gift for apt illustration, although I got a little tired of his repeated endorsements of the views of Woody Allen. I liked this book well enough to look forward to his "Bluffer's Guide to Philosophy," which sounds like it's right up my alley.

  • John
    2019-06-24 03:38

    This book is one of a very, very few books I put in a crucial category indeed: Christian books, written by well-qualified Christian intellectuals, that you could give to a non-Christian-and-non-academic-but-intelligent reader.Yes, there's C. S. Lewis. And then there's...well, not many. The book now seems a little dated in a few of its references to popular culture. But the wit and wisdom have generally worn well, and there is plenty of them both on every page.Tom Morris was a brilliant philosopher at the University of Notre Dame who left a tenured professorship to bring philosophy to business--and beyond (he is the author of Philosophy for Dummies, among other popular books). His quite extraordinary ability to render powerful ideas in a popular way shows up nowhere better than here.If you're a Christian, you'll be the better for reading this book. And then you'll want to buy copies to give to your smart friends. And, as I say, there aren't many books like that.

  • DJ Dycus
    2019-05-30 05:08

    Morris is so easy to read, and he deals with complex philosophical issues in a manner that make them accessible and comprehensible. Pascal's Pensees is a random collection of thoughts and ideas that were never put into their proper, final form; Morris comes along and takes these puzzle pieces and provides context--a philosophical and theological framework into which they would have originally fit.The first time through I marked a lot of passages, but I feel as if one reading isn't adequate to absorbing all of the wisdom and brilliance to be gleaned. I'll definitely be reading this again in the near future.

  • Julia
    2019-06-25 04:58

    Clear, concise writing and thoughtful explanations. I may have not agreed with everything, but I enjoyed the journey and thought a lot about my own life.

  • Jeffrey Backlin
    2019-06-06 01:48

    A breakdown and investigation into the thoughts of one of the most interesting philosophers I've read.

  • IWB
    2019-06-18 05:53

    "This book is exceptional; I should like to encourage all my friends, enemies, and those in between to read it as well."

  • Sam
    2019-06-02 02:45

    Wish the Pensees could be dealt with as a whole and not as a collection of Proverbs? This is the book for you.

  • John Cross
    2019-06-19 01:51

    One of my favorite all time books