Read The Burning Time: Henry VIII, Bloody Mary, and the Protestant Martyrs of London by Virginia Rounding Online

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Smithfield, settled on the fringes of Roman London, was once a place of revelry. Jesters and crowds flocked for the medieval St Bartholomew's Day celebrations, tournaments were plentiful and it became the location of London's most famous meat market. Yet in Tudor England, Smithfield had another, more sinister use: the public execution of heretics.The Burning Time is a viviSmithfield, settled on the fringes of Roman London, was once a place of revelry. Jesters and crowds flocked for the medieval St Bartholomew's Day celebrations, tournaments were plentiful and it became the location of London's most famous meat market. Yet in Tudor England, Smithfield had another, more sinister use: the public execution of heretics.The Burning Time is a vivid insight into an era in which what was orthodoxy one year might be dangerous heresy the next. The first martyrs were Catholics, who cleaved to Rome in defiance of Henry VIII's break with the papacy. But with the accession of Henry's daughter Mary - soon to be nicknamed 'Bloody Mary' - the charge of heresy was leveled against devout Protestants, who chose to burn rather than recant.At the center of Virginia Rounding's vivid account of this extraordinary period are two very different characters. The first is Richard Rich, Thomas Cromwell's protege, who, almost uniquely, remained in a position of great power, influence and wealth under three Tudor monarchs, and who helped send many devout men and women to their deaths. The second is John Deane, Rector of St Bartholomew's, who was able, somehow, to navigate the treacherous waters of changing dogma and help others to survive.The Burning Time is their story, but it is also the story of the hundreds of men and women who were put to the fire for their faith....

Title : The Burning Time: Henry VIII, Bloody Mary, and the Protestant Martyrs of London
Author :
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ISBN : 9781250040640
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 480 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Burning Time: Henry VIII, Bloody Mary, and the Protestant Martyrs of London Reviews

  • TL
    2018-11-11 20:05

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. All my opinions are my own.---Very interesting read... it once again made me glad I didn't live during this time. My mouth would have definitely gotten me in trouble at some point.I liked that this was written in a way that wasn't "textbook sounding", if you know what I mean. It was easy to read and kept me turning the pages. The only trouble I had was keeping names straight haha. Maybe it'll get easier the more I read of these times?It amazed me (though maybe it shouldn't have) at some of the stuff happening/that went on. Especially the things that went on while Henry was trying to divorce Katherine too....(Having him a distant ancestor is... interesting haha)Would recommend... looking forward to other's thoughts on this once more reviews start popping up.

  • Emelia
    2018-11-07 18:13

    This book has taken me longer to read than almost any book I have read. And it was well worth the time. One of the reasons it took me so long to read is Virginia Rounding has gathered information on one of the most troubled and bloodiest times in history, information and instances I was unaware of, information that I myself wanted to research. I received an advanced copy and was looking forward to reading it thinking it would give me a fresh perspective on this bloody period; I was amazed at the content to say the least.When one reads of the burning times, most books focus on Henry VIII's daughter Mary and glazes over the very people that Mary's edict's affect. The Catholic's and Protestants of England. This book is written from the perspective of two of the most influential, but seldom written on, men in England's history. Richard Rich and John Deane.Richard Rich was the protege of Thomas Cromwell and uniquely stayed in power during the reign of three Tudor monarchs; a man who was responsible for sending hundreds of men and women to their fiery deaths. Rich was perhaps, next to Cromwell, the most powerful and the most obnoxious of the former king's ministers. After the failure of the Protestant rebellion Rich invented heretic's and systematically rounded up Protestants and devoted himself zealously to the work of their eradication, being described as the hammer, and Cromwell was the mall. John Deane was the Rector of St. Bartholomew's and worked under both the Protestant and Roman Catholic régimes during the English Reformation ; somehow able to avoid persecution during the burning times and was instrumental in saving the lives of hundreds. Sir John as he was fondly called, also established a grammar school for poor boys in Witton on Michaelmas 1557.The Burning Times takes the reader into the world of an unstable religious era where what was orthodoxy one minute could quickly change into heresy the next. A time when public executions were commonplace and where Mary, soon to be dubbed "Bloody Mary", murdered hundreds of Protestants who chose burning instead of the recanting of their faith.For those of you who are searching for a broader knowledge of one of the most horrific time in religious history, I strongly recommend the reading of Rounding's "The Burning Times." It is brilliantly written and one of the most fascinating books I have read, filled with incredible insight and written with heart.

  • Aaron
    2018-10-30 17:03

    Stuck between 4 & 5 stars. This is a well-researched and excellently laid out historical work centered upon England during the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI & Mary I. Given its non-fiction nature, it could be dry reading for those not interested in the time period or the Protestant martyrs.I found the book captivating and enlightening. Much of England's history is vague for myself with only a minimal recollection of names like Bloody Mary & Henry VIII (the song from Ghost being my best reference). So I must add this as a book that has helped me place events and people into better perspective.For an author looking to write historical fiction, this would be a great reference for the underlying facts and people. The tumultuous times lend to the creation of great stories. And for those interested in Church history, this provides a perspective on how politics and religion were so intertwined.The epilogue provides a great commentary by the author tying the relevance of events from over 500 years ago to today's "modern" thinking. Revealing her own thoughts and beliefs connected this heavy work to something the reader can ponder and digest.Back to my rating. As a scholarly read or as a reference piece, I'd put this at 5 stars. For the layman looking to add to their knowledge, the reading becomes something more of a chore, keeping track of the people, places and dates and could go as low as 3 stars. Let this book find the right audience as it deserves, in my opinion, more than 4 stars.* I received a free Advance Uncorrected Proof from Goodreads giveaways *

  • Adrienne Dillard
    2018-10-25 15:56

    If you are looking for a superficial overview of the religious turmoil that dogged the Tudor period, this is not the book for you. If, however, you want an in-depth analysis from an extremely knowledgeable source, you've come to the right place. Rounding is a gifted writer, and it's clear that she has probed every extent source on these horrific events in England's history. The familiar names are here, of course - John Rogers, Anne Askew, Thomas Cranmer, etc - but those who history has seemed to forgotten finally find their story told with equal reverence. The narrative is dense and sometimes dreary, but that's to be expected. Religious martyrdom is a serious subject that deserves an academic, rather than popular approach. I highly recommend this book to anyone seeking a deeper understanding of the religious reformation, the people leading or attempting to hinder it, and the victims of their actions.

  • Yibbie
    2018-11-05 20:11

    It’s a very interesting and informative book about the changing religious views of Tudor England.It starts out a little slow. Rounding takes the time to carefully introduce the major players of the time period and explain the changing political and religious climate. Then she starts introducing the martyrs in chronological order and from there the pace picks up. When possible, she lets each person tell his own story through his own writings and verifies it from other sources. She only digresses from their personal stories to explain the political changes that affected them. Even though the timeline moves back and forth with each martyrs story, I never felt lost. She did a wonderful job of keeping it very clear.To make the quoted court records, letters, memoirs, and period accounts easier to read, Rounding updated the spelling and grammar.Several times in the book she spoke dismissively of the idea of absolute truth. I thought it was written by a secular scholar with a definite post-modern view of Scripture. In the Epilogue, however, she tells us that she is an Anglican with Catholic leanings. I’m a Baptist. Those doctrines are still as divergent as they were then, maybe more. So I didn’t really agree with much of the Epilogue in which she opines on everything she would have us learn from that terrible time. Her conclusion was that it would be best if humanity learned to doubt. That would save us from the evils of religious persecution, ISIS, and intolerance. She seems not to accept the idea that God has told us some very definite things in His Word, and He expects us to obey Him, not our culture or our desires.It’s a good secular chronicle of what happened, and what each side believed. I found it very encouraging.I received this as a free ARC from NetGalley and St. Martin’s Press. No favorable review was required. These are my honest opinions.

  • Joyce
    2018-10-30 14:59

    4 starsAs an avid student of Tudor history, I found this book to be both informative and interesting. Although a little dry for the casual reader, it is a valuable resource as a history of religious-based martyrdom in 16th Century England. The book is filled with quotes from those who were witnesses, where available, and those who speculated on what may have happened. It gives a history of how the unfortunate individuals named in the book came to be condemned as heretics as well as how they became to believe the way they did at the time of their death. The whims of a powerful king were laid out in the book and the changing nature of religion, of what was allowed to be believed was illustrated very clearly. You could be condemned as a heretic on the slightest suspicion, or by a neighbor or enemy out to increase his/her position with the court or the king. Lies were told; perjury of testimony was common. What was true on one day might not be true on the next. It must have been a horrible time in which to live, not knowing exactly what to “believe.” As King Henry VIII changed his views in order to get what he wanted, without regard to the people he governed, he created a terrible quandary. He was a Catholic at heart, but his personal wants outweighed his belief in the Catholic Church. This book is well written and well laid out. It traces a linear path through the history of the deaths of so-called heretics in the 16th Century. It is a must for anyone studying this era, or who has an interest the history of heretical beliefs in England. I want to thank NetGalley and St. Martin’s Press for forwarding to me a copy of this interesting and informative book to read and enjoy.

  • Willy Marz Thiessam
    2018-11-10 17:02

    Few books will ever give you the feeling that this book will. Virginia Rounding in her new book "The Burning Time", places the reader in a remarkable position. In this view of the history of the Protestant Martyrs under the reigns of Henry VIII and Mary there is a clear and brilliant narrative that draws on a great deal of documentation and analysis. I've studied this period and these events since I started university 30 years ago. With this book its like I have been wearing the wrong prescription glasses and everything before was a blur. This book adds definition and a sense of immediacy that I have never experienced about this period. The subject of course is not an easy one to come to grips with. The inhumanity of torture and execution in this time of religious persecution is told in such a way you know with clarity and certainty the life of those who were the victims and those who were the persecutors. I do not believe I will ever forget the descriptions of Richard Rich and Anne Askew. It is all so real that you can not rush this book, its the best you can get to being there. Sadly it does have some drawbacks. For such a period of history nothing we write will ever be perfect as it was so remarkable and influential as to what came after. So I hope the author if she reads this will allow me a few words about what you the reader may need to augment this work with. Parallels both modern and historical are drawn on and examined by the author. She cautions where parallels may be taken too far and is very insightful where she examines the context that the persecutions took place in. The use of the inquisition as a political method to unify the kingdom in Spain is something that I think should be considered and referenced in relation to these events. We can see through the Spanish marriage alliance that the inquisition methods were used in England at this time with a very large Spanish influence. Secondly the history of martyrdom of early Christianity should have been discussed. Martyrdom is an essential aspect to the creation of early Christianity. The parallels to the two periods are remarkable, both in how the martyrs saw themselves and also how persecution played into the narrative they were creating. It raises the question of whether the works of the Church Fathers such as Polycarp may have influenced the martyrs. They knew the bible cold, so its unlikely the Church Fathers would have been unknown to them. These aspects aside this is a great book for anyone who has more than a passing interest in this history and for anyone who wants to understand the critical beginnings of Protestantism in the English speaking world. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in the history of Theology or Politics.

  • Kristi Richardson
    2018-11-02 12:58

    “Then they did put me on the rack, because I confessed no ladies nor gentlewomen to be of my opinion, and thereon they kept me a long time.” Anne AskewThis is the history of the Protestant martyrs of London during the reigns of King Henry VIII and his daughter Mary Tudor. When we think of Mary Tudor, her nickname of “Bloody Mary” is well known. Lost in the history of Henry VIII is that although he fought with the Pope over his divorce, he was still a Catholic at heart. My favorite part of this book is about the interrogation, torture and eventual killing of Anne Askew. Ms. Askew’s biggest sin was to read the Bible and have the temerity of teaching from it. She was tortured after being condemned to die in order to point some fingers at other noblewomen who felt like she did, including the current Queen of England, Katharine Parr. She refused to speak against anyone else and truly died a martyr for her faith. Katharine Parr was the only Queen to survive her marriage to King Henry intact. This book tells the story of various people of faith by weaving their lives into the lives of Richard Rich, a Cromwell minion and John Deane, Rector of St. Bartholomew who was able to help others survive this bloody time, as well as save his own life. These men were two opposites, which makes their story even more compelling. I would recommend this book to anyone who takes seriously the history of the Reformation. This book is not for people who would rather watch the simplified edition on the History Channel. There is much depth and research that went into writing this book and it will take you along with lots of notes, quotes and facts. I enjoyed this book very much and am happy that I received this book through the First Reads program on Goodreads.

  • Joyce
    2018-11-12 21:05

    4 starsAs an avid student of Tudor history, I found this book to be both informative and interesting. Although a little dry for the casual reader, it is a valuable resource as a history of religious-based martyrdom in 16th Century England. The book is filled with quotes from those who were witnesses, where available, and those who speculated on what may have happened. It gives a history of how the unfortunate individuals named in the book came to be condemned as heretics as well as how they became to believe the way they did at the time of their death. The whims of a powerful king were laid out in the book and the changing nature of religion, of what was allowed to be believed was illustrated very clearly. You could be condemned as a heretic on the slightest suspicion, or by a neighbor or enemy out to increase his/her position with the court or the king. Lies were told; perjury of testimony was common. What was true on one day might not be true on the next. It must have been a horrible time in which to live, not knowing exactly what to “believe.” As King Henry VIII changed his views in order to get what he wanted, without regard to the people he governed, he created a terrible quandary. He was a Catholic at heart, but his personal wants outweighed his belief in the Catholic Church. This book is well written and well laid out. It traces a linear path through the history of the deaths of so-called heretics in the 16th Century. It is a must for anyone studying this era, or who has an interest the history of heretical beliefs in England. I want to thank NetGalley and St. Martin’s Press for forwarding to me a copy of this interesting and informative book to read and enjoy.

  • Pulse
    2018-10-24 19:05

    This book was received from a Goodreads contest.The Burning Time is a very educational insight to a tumultuous time in English history, where the whims of leaders are the difference between life and death. I had learned the gist of Henry VIII's marriage foibles in study before, so I'm glad that this book provides me the opportunity to see it from a ground level.The juxtaposition of John Deane and Richard Rich provides an intriguing driving force. Despite being positioned on either side of the divide, both the Catholic and the feckless member of Henry's regime found themselves irrevocably embroiled in England's troubles. Both friends and enemies burned, so their lives also serve as a reminder of the link shared by two opposing faiths.The tone of the book is scholarly, but it is still engaging enough to keep me turning the pages. The events portrayed in this book constitute horrible reminders of the worst of humanity, where faith, interpretation, and selfishness lead to the brutal martyrdom of scores of citizens, rich and poor, young and old, famous or obscure. Given what the world looks like in 2017, the Smithfield burnings aren't that far off after all. The message resonates as strongly as ever, and everyone owes it to themselves to read it and think.

  • Lgross
    2018-10-28 21:17

    Won this book through goodreads giveaways. There is a lot of information in this book. It took me a while to get through. The underlying theme of the changes to religion in England in the 1500's carries the narrative from monarch to monarch. While the ruler and religion may have changed over the years, one thing that remained the same was the burning of heretics. This book offers insight into the circumstances and lives surrounding the burning of certain individuals. There are a lot of characters throughout this book, sometimes it's hard to keep track. The author, however, does connect the past to the present at the end of this book.

  • John
    2018-11-12 15:00

    This is not a book for a casual reader. If you are a student of Tudor England this a good resource book. Read it slowly and carefully or you may become lost. But if you do read carefully you will find this a very knowledgeable book of the time. The only change I would make was comparing it to the fundamentalist Muslim movement of today. I found I was drawing parallels to the Islamic State and to the Soviet Union after the death of Stalin. What is acceptable beliefs today become tomorrow's heresies and the acceptable today, catching those involved in a no win situation.

  • Jim
    2018-10-28 14:00

    I was a Goodreads winner of this book. A fascinating read about the people who were burned at the stake during the time of Henry VIII, Edward VI and Bloody Mary. An insightful study about the tyrannical powers of the Church, the kings and queens over the heretics at that time over various people and their beliefs. The book shows the concept that if one does not believe what we want you to believe then we will kill you, there are implications right up to the present time with this type of thought and control.

  • Anthonia
    2018-10-27 17:16

    A true diamond in the rough. I have always liked history, and in this book you get a lot of historical detail from that time period in this book. It gives you insight on what the power of change can truly do during that era. Not to mention the people were condemned like the tides. I enjoyed reading this tale and it is a must read for any and all history lovers everywhere.

  • Lehtomaki
    2018-10-22 17:07

    Nonfiction-history

  • Deanna
    2018-10-18 17:58

    Unfortunately, I found the book very difficult to read. It read very much like a text book rather than story form.

  • Felicia Allen
    2018-10-24 17:50

    it was very well researched but hard to read.... it read more like a history book than a book. there were a lot of facts. It was pretty interesting.

  • Jill Marsillett
    2018-11-14 21:16

    480 page snooze fest.

  • Le Ann
    2018-11-13 21:01

    A great historical rendering of the persecution of Protestants in the 16th century. Well written and researched. It was enlightening.

  • Alaina
    2018-11-09 14:02

    I am writing this review for someone else. This person enjoyed it

  • Ruth Feathers
    2018-10-24 15:59

    Well researched and written.