Read Rethinking American Women's Activism by Annelise Orleck Online

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In this enthralling narrative, Annelise Orleck chronicles the history of the American women's movement from the nineteenth century to the present. Starting with an incisive introduction that calls for a reconceptualization of American feminist history to encompass multiple streams of women's activism, she weaves the personal with the political, vividly evoking the events aIn this enthralling narrative, Annelise Orleck chronicles the history of the American women's movement from the nineteenth century to the present. Starting with an incisive introduction that calls for a reconceptualization of American feminist history to encompass multiple streams of women's activism, she weaves the personal with the political, vividly evoking the events and people who participated in our era's most far-reaching social revolutions.In short, thematic chapters, Orleck enables readers to understand the impact of women's activism, and highlights how feminism has flourished through much of the past century within social movements that have too often been treated as completely separate. Showing that women s activism has taken many forms, has intersected with issues of class and race, and has continued during periods of backlash, "Rethinking American Women s Activism" is a perfect introduction to the subject for anyone interested in women s history and social movements."...

Title : Rethinking American Women's Activism
Author :
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ISBN : 9780415811736
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 230 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Rethinking American Women's Activism Reviews

  • Melissa
    2018-10-13 20:45

    Read for my American Women's History class. I thought that Orleck did a remarkable job of summarizing the activism of American women between Seneca Falls and 2013. I particularly enjoyed the inclusion of the stories and activism of women of color and women in poverty--I feel like these stories are often ignored or forgotten. My only problem with these types of books is that when a book (particularly such a short one) covers such a broad expanse of time, I have a hard time holding on to that information since it doesn't go into such depth. However, that's a personal flaw rather than a complaint of the book. Overall, I'd really recommend to anyone interested in women's history! However, if you're interested in an easier, quicker read, I'd probably recommend Gail Collins' When Everything Changed first.