Read The Dialect and Folk Phrases of the Cotswolds by Alan Sutton Online

the-dialect-and-folk-phrases-of-the-cotswolds

This book brings together the work of three pioneer historians who took the trouble to record what they heard spoken in the area. In chronological terms, the first was John Smyth, of Nibley (1567-1641), steward to the Berkeleys (1589-1640). His manuscript is dated 1605, but he made amendments throughout his life, the last of which are dated 1639. The manuscript was publishThis book brings together the work of three pioneer historians who took the trouble to record what they heard spoken in the area. In chronological terms, the first was John Smyth, of Nibley (1567-1641), steward to the Berkeleys (1589-1640). His manuscript is dated 1605, but he made amendments throughout his life, the last of which are dated 1639. The manuscript was published in 1885 under the title A Description of the Hundred of Berkeley. The second was a scholarly work by Richard Webster Huntley (1793-1857), whose Glossary of the Cotswold Dialect was published posthumously the year after his death. Last but not least G.F. Northall's Folk Phrases of Four Counties (1894), builds upon Huntley's work and reminds us that many familiar phrases such as 'stick and stones may break my bones' had their root in this area....

Title : The Dialect and Folk Phrases of the Cotswolds
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781848680180
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 125 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Dialect and Folk Phrases of the Cotswolds Reviews

  • Paul Brogan
    2019-03-11 23:05

    'Hee that feares every grasse must never pisse in a meadow.'There are plenty of meadows in the Cotswolds, my childhood home, so it's natural that folk phrases would focus on them, and on sheep, and on a million other features familiar to those lucky enough to have lived there. It's been decades since I left for a bigger world, but this book was a wonderfully nostalgic reminder that if the Cotswolds seemed small then, they appear more worthy now from a distance.I'm never going to remember all the phrases. The people I live with now wouldn't understand me most of the time if I were to use them, especially in the proper dialect, but I loved taking this step backwards in time and geography. I hope the people who are still there appreciate the richness of their heritage.