Read Cora Fry's Pillow Book by Rosellen Brown Online

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Through the persona of Cora Fry, a wife and mother living in a small New Hampshire town, Rosellen Brown explores the ambivalent ties of love, loyalty, marriage, and family in a series of related poems. This volume includes the entire text of Cora Fry (1977), a kind of dramatic monologue, written in spare, simple lines, which describes the young woman's daily life and troubThrough the persona of Cora Fry, a wife and mother living in a small New Hampshire town, Rosellen Brown explores the ambivalent ties of love, loyalty, marriage, and family in a series of related poems. This volume includes the entire text of Cora Fry (1977), a kind of dramatic monologue, written in spare, simple lines, which describes the young woman's daily life and troubled marriage. A sequel of newer poems, Cora Fry's Pillow Book (1994), confronts the challenges that come with a woman's growth toward middle age, reflecting an older Cora's place in her family, community, and the larger world....

Title : Cora Fry's Pillow Book
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ISBN : 9780374524432
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 192 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Cora Fry's Pillow Book Reviews

  • Beth
    2018-10-06 01:09

    This one is definitely a novel in poems as opposed to a novel in verse. What's the difference? Well, unlike Omeros or Autobiography of Red (the latter of which is subtitled A Novel in Verse), its segments are untitled lyric poems rather than numbered chapters. As the title suggests, it resembles a diary. Set in rural New Hampshire, it's mostly about the speaker/protagonist's relationships: with her husband, children, parents, brother, friends, even her hometown. In fact the poems are mostly about sadness, loss, disconnection and conflict in those relationships. The poetic form heightens these feelings by making Cora seem isolated, as though she has no one to talk to except the implicit and invisible lyric addressee. She reports conversations, but there is never more than a sentence or two of quoted speech from the other person, and it is always surrounded by Cora's private thoughts. I think the form also undermines the coherence of her life (not of the book, but of her life) by presenting it in fragments, intense emotional and perceptual experiences connected as much by Cora's voice as by any kind of narrative.I think a reader who wasn't into poetry would still enjoy the story. Brown's free verse is not that formally challenging. As someone who is into poetry I was struck more by image and metaphor than by rhetoric and rhythm. This passage, one of my favorites, is from a lyric about driving (a mail delivery truck) in the fog:...Every stop sign, every hunkering truckblooms out of nowhere, much too closewhen you finally see it. One day it's going to costs me my life, creeping this slug-trail, getting the mail out blind.I never knew how odd it was untilI spent my first night far from the river. Then I learned that summer morning is born in light, most places. The air had cleared its throat and its voicewas pure: sunlight, sharp outlines, deep shadows. What we, when the fog burns off,call afternoon.It's not obvious that this is part of a narrative, and yet I don't think the poems in this book stand separately. Their meaning needs the framework of the place and of Cora's life.

  • Barbara
    2018-09-23 19:25

    I read the original (Cora Fry) when my marriage was falling apart. This new edition contains the original text and the newer poems (Cora Fry's Pillow Book). I gave away my original copy and bought this new edition because there's some poetry that is wanting to be written about a woman in an old photograph that I bought at a flea market.

  • Skye
    2018-10-21 02:06

    This book is amazing!! I love it so much. You fall in love with Cora Fry and the poems stick with you years later. It would be a great book to teach because it blends the genres of poetry and fiction, and is short enough that high school students wouldn't be too intimidated. A lovely little book!

  • Paula Mckinley
    2018-10-12 02:13

    Well crafted, sharp, poignant with lines that you constantly think about and turn over in your mind. This is one that I borrowed from the library and I am going to buy!

  • Elana
    2018-10-09 19:23

    Did you know poetry could have a story line? This is a collection of two books of poetry about a small-town New Hampshire woman. Love it!

  • Debra Hale-Shelton
    2018-09-21 19:09

    Relevant, real-life poems. I loved this little book by novelist, poet, essayist Rosellen Brown.