Read The Future of the Global Church: History, Trends, and Possibilities by Patrick Johnstone Online

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What is the future of the global church, and how and where do we fit into that picture? The Future of the Global Church has grown out of fifty years of passion, research, and study beginning with the first edition of Patrick Johnstone s highly esteemed book Operation World. It weaves together the history, demography, and growth of the major world religions including ChristWhat is the future of the global church, and how and where do we fit into that picture? The Future of the Global Church has grown out of fifty years of passion, research, and study beginning with the first edition of Patrick Johnstone s highly esteemed book Operation World. It weaves together the history, demography, and growth of the major world religions including Christianity, giving us a visual and textual overview of the past, present, and possible future of the global Church. A fascinating glimpse into the next 40 years, FOTGC includes: Data and extrapolations that highlight likely scenarios for evangelical Christian ministry in the coming four decades Interpreted overviews of the worldwide impact of the first 20 centuries of Christianity Comparisons of the impact of Christianity and those of the other world religions Summaries of the past, present, and likely future contributions of the different Christian traditions and streams"...

Title : The Future of the Global Church: History, Trends, and Possibilities
Author :
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ISBN : 9781606571323
Format Type : ePub
Number of Pages : 184 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Future of the Global Church: History, Trends, and Possibilities Reviews

  • Clint Walker
    2018-12-23 23:00

    This year, Biblica (formerly known as the International Bible Society) formally sold the book publishing part of their ministry to Intervarsity Press. Intervarsity has been busy in promoting this partnership, and many of the new books they will be able to offer through the Biblica imprint. One of the first books released in this partnership is a smart, slick book on the state of the church around the world called The Future of the Global Church.The Future of the Global Church is an excellent resource. It is primarily a statistical book. It begins by informing its readers about population changes and people movements throughout the world. Johnstone then clearly identifies in short bullet points what the challenges are for missions and evangelism in the midst of the changing world we live in. In the process, he clearly shows that the historic Christian West is in decline, and that the Muslim church in Asia and Africa is growing rapidly.Johnstone also devotes a whole section of his book to the historic development and growth of the church from a global perspective. Want to know where the biggest revivals were in the world in the 20th century? The Future of the Global Church has a couple of pages devoted just to that topic. I am constantly amazed at how much detail and information is in this small book.The Future of the Global Church also traces historic and global trends in the rise and decline of each of the world's major world religions. It also pays careful attention to how different sects within each of these religious groupings are growing or declining, and what that means for Christian witness in regions where those religious groups are strongest.Johnstone also does a significant amount of work tracking and discussing the different "megablocs" within Christian circles. I learned, for instance, that that Anglican church is much more populous in Nigeria and Kenya than in the United States. I also learned that by 2050, Johnstone projects there will be more people in the Anglican Fellowship in Uganda and Nigeria than in the United Kingdom. Pretty fascinating information right there!The Future of the Global Church also pays particular attention to the victories and challenges of the evangelical churches around the world. Did you know that China will have more evangelicals than the United States does by 2050? Johnstone also identifies the unchurched around the world not only by nations and regions within nations, but he also identifies those folks by people groups. For instance, in Africa the Pygmy folks are predominantly Muslim, but the Bantu folks are predominantly Christian.Do you want to pray for the world? Do you have a passion for evangelistic mission in the church? Do you want to be a global Christian? If so, I would strongly recommend purchasing this fine book, and letting it inform your prayers, your giving, your evangelistic efforts and your worldview. Get to know the world God put you in, and begin to love and care for it with intelligence as a disciple of Jesus.

  • Mark
    2019-01-07 01:07

    When I was a student in university, God used Patrick Johnstone's Operation World and other similar resources to begin to educate me and give me a burden for what He was doing and wanted to do in the world around us. Some years after that, I lived for 16 years as an international worker in one certain corner of the world, Partly due to preoccupation with what I was doing here during that time, and partly due to our organization cutting back on missions resources previously made available to missionaries due to budget constraints, I did not always do a good job in keeping up to date with the big picture which every global Christian should ask God's Spirit to impart and maintain. Thus, my "tunnel vision" grew more and more severe. Enter Patrick Johnstone's The Future of the Global Church. Reading this resource alongside my daily devotions a page or two at a time, it took me nearly a year to finish this resource book. It's not an easy book to digest (the charts and graphs were sometimes difficult for me to decipher-- maybe due to a minor condition of color blindness) and I found myself plodding through some sections. Two other minor criticisms I have with this work are 1) the tendency to group more by country rather than people group, and 2) projections running out to the year 2050 seem somewhat arbitrary). Having said that, I would heartily recommend this book as a must-read resource which helps us see the past, present, and future of Jesus' church and the nations amongst which it dwells much more as the God who created the world and everything in it sees it. Leaders may wish to explore the e-books, DVDs, and other resources as well in order to educate church people.

  • Bill
    2019-01-06 21:49

    According to Johnstone, by 2050 Christianity in Europe and the Pacific will have continued its catastrophic decline, but Christianity in Asia, Latin America and Africa will have continued its massive growth, largely amongst Evangelicals (especially Pentecostals). The book is a massive statistical project, plenty of fantastic maps, charts etc, more of a reference than one to read cover to cover. I loved the section on Church History, especially the 20 pairs of maps tracing every major & minor empire and the geographic spread of the church. Johnstone is not afraid to express his opinions in the non-statistical segments, which keeps things interesting but takes away from the objectivity of the book. He projects robust growth for Islam also, particularly as a significant immigration driven people-movement which will change the nature of Europe very significantly. The second half of the book focuses on world evangelisation and the 2 billion people who have yet to hear the Christian message.

  • Brent Barnard
    2019-01-20 03:08

    This basically gives a lot of global demographics, along with demographics of the Christian world. For instance, Johnstone takes the region of the Indian subcontinent and shows which people-groups/affinity groups are related. For example, the Himalayan peoples are a different people group from most of the people groups of India, but the Himalayan peoples are further subdivided by tribe and clan. That type of thing. Then he discusses the extent to which each of the groups has been impacted by the gospel. On a few of the pages he comes off as being a socialist, but otherwise, this is a good book and worth perusing.

  • Shelly Hart
    2019-01-10 21:44

    A comprehensive look at the church including statistics that leave the reader well informed.