Read Billions of Years, Amazing Changes: The Story of Evolution by Laurence Pringle Steve Jenkins Online

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Ever since Charles Darwin revealed his landmark ideas about evolution in 1859, new findings have confirmed, expanded, and refined his concepts. Now, author Laurence Pringle, one of the nation's premier science writers, brings together the pillars of evidence that support our understanding of evolution in this ALA Notable Children's Book. Field biology, genetics, geology, pEver since Charles Darwin revealed his landmark ideas about evolution in 1859, new findings have confirmed, expanded, and refined his concepts. Now, author Laurence Pringle, one of the nation's premier science writers, brings together the pillars of evidence that support our understanding of evolution in this ALA Notable Children's Book. Field biology, genetics, geology, paleontology, and medicine all add to the impressive structure of evidence. With a perfect blend of science and art, renowned illustrator Steve Jenkins creates stunning new depictions of important concepts and key evolutionary scientists. More than fifty photographs capture natural marvels, including awe-inspiring fossils, life forms, and geological wonders. The result is a full, clear, and up-to-date account of the monumental evidence supporting the modern view of evolution....

Title : Billions of Years, Amazing Changes: The Story of Evolution
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781590787236
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 112 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Billions of Years, Amazing Changes: The Story of Evolution Reviews

  • Krista the Krazy Kataloguer
    2018-12-07 05:10

    What I liked about this book was the clear, systematic explanation Pringle provided for the concept of evolution. The photographs and Steven Jenkins' outstanding cut paper illustrations supported the text beautifully. The chapter on genetics was particularly interesting to me, especially learning the organisms and animals scientists have been able to decipher the genomes of. I had also never heard of the terms convergent evolution or adaptive radiation before. A glossary at the back of the book provides a quick reference for other terms, and a list of books and web sites for further research was also welcome. This book is a great text for students just learning about the concept of evolution. Recommended.

  • Angie
    2018-11-17 11:23

    This is perhaps the best young readers' books on evolution I have ever read. It is incredibly clear and concise, very easy to follow, and manages to convey a wide array of complex ideas in a very easy-to-understand format. The pictures are gorgeous, and the overall setup of the book is quite intuitive, while refraining from being too overwhelming or going into unnecessary details. I marveled again and again at the absolute clarity of this book; I can't make enough positive comments about this book, and I would recommend it as an introduction or a refresher for adult or child.

  • ME
    2018-11-28 05:20

    WARD, Marget-Billions or Years, Amazing Changes: The Story of Evolution by Laurence PringleThis book is a wonderful resource about evolution and its beginnings with a reading level for elementary students. It addresses the geology of the earth and tells the story of Charles Darwin and his book On the Origin of Species. Evolution depends on four basic characteristic of nature: variation, nature’s bounty, completion and natural selection and examples of such are given. It also simplifies explanations on genetics and DNA. Biogeography is the study of how and why living things are distributed on earth and this book addresses that scientific field as well. This book has a glossary and a good index to help review what the reader has read and is a great starter book for many potential scientists.A wonderful fiction book I found to complement Billions of Years, is Children of Time Evolution and the Human Story by Anne H. Weaver. It is a collection of six stories based on actual bones and artifacts that were found in various archeologist digs from around the world. Subsequently, the stories give names and places to further attract the reader and their curiosity for the subject. At the end of each story, there is a section called “The Science Behind the Story” which sparks remembering, understanding skills and applying skills to the non-fiction book. Children of Time has a glossary and some charts and maps. Learning about evolution can sometimes be a rather dry subject but both of the books together could make for a motivating, enthusiastic assignment that some students might otherwise overlook. Both of these books seem to be on the same reading level of about ages 9 and up but could also be useful for anyone interested in evolution simplified. This book is by far the best pairing I found for all the books in the assignment.

  • Tracey
    2018-11-21 03:56

    In Billions of Years, Amazing Changes : The Story of Evolution, Laurence Pringle, an award-winning children’s science writer, traces the history of scientific discoveries relating to evolution.He begins with early geologists, who noticed that rock layers showed the changes that had been made by powerful forces from inside the Earth, and who discovered fossils of strange creatures not found in their time. He describes the voyages of Charles Darwin and how his discoveries in the Galapagos Islands led to the theory of evolution.“Evolution”, says Pringle, “is simply change over time,” and this change depends on basic characteristics of nature. Pringle almost as simply explains these characteristics, which include variation, competition, and natural selection. Though Darwin and other scientists throughout the world agreed that evolution explained the changes in the Earth, science was not advanced enough at that time to explain exactly HOW it happened.Pringle goes on to explain how several fields of science have contributed to understanding the “how.” Geologists have discovered how to tell the age of rocks by measuring their radioactive decay. Scientists discovered DNA and figured out not only how genes work but how mutations in DNA cause variation. Geologists have also come to understand how plate tectonics and continental drift have affected the distribution of life on our planet.Billions of Years, Amazing Changes provides a clear and accurate description of several complex concepts related to evolution. Not only can it be used for studying about evolution, genetics, and geology, but it is also interesting enough for young science buffs to read for fun. In addition, Steve Jenkins’ signature collage artwork enhances this fascinating book. (Originally written for and posted on Mackin Books in Bloom at http://mackinbooksinbloom.com)

  • M.M. Hudson
    2018-11-18 12:18

    The concept of evolution is often hotly debated among people. I do not care to get into such a debate. This is a science book and it has to be read as such. Evolution has come to be an acceptable process of natural life and death. This book meticulously delves into such a process with scientific facts and evidence. Throughout the book there are numerous photos to support such findings. The illustrator in this case did a fantastic job. The author did elaborate research to also support these findings.The books is thorough. Although I read this in one sitting, I would suggest a middle school child not do so. Again, it is a science book by nature (excuse the pun) and is really meant to be studied slower for fuller understanding.There is a glossary in the back which is very helpful in the process of studying this book. Many words might be difficult to understand even thought the author did a fairly good job of explaining a word within the text. In addition, there is an index in the very back of the book for studying one particular subject within the book as well as bibliography. This is also nice as a child reader may want to study further a particular section.Overall, I liked the book and could see it used in classrooms. I give it 4 stars.Disclosure: I obtained this book through my local library. The views expressed here are 100% my own and may not reflect your own. ~Naila Moon

  • Elizabeth
    2018-11-28 04:05

    Billions of Years, Amazing Changes is a middle grade introduction to evolution and related concepts by Laurence Pringle.Including a glossary, a "read more" list, and a source list, Billions of Years, Amazing Changes utilizes short chapters to introduce geology, fossils, Darwin, evolution, genetics, and plate tectonics. The book does not lose sight of the age range of the reader or the fact that this is meant to be an introduction. The book provides both history of the subject, as well as contemporary examples that students will understand. For example, the mutation of the flu, which allows re-infection of people who have already had the flu.The text itself is standard non-fiction text, but the author's style is quite readable and the book is set up with brief chapters and a fair amount of photos, illustrations, and additional information boxes; which are effective in keeping the reader engaged. The illustrations are provided by Steve Jenkins, who also has many popular non-fiction books for children. The set up also allows the reader to easily read one chapter and be done for the evening, which can be a bonus when readers are developing intellectual stamina as middle schoolers should be doing.This book fits into earth science or life science classes. It also makes a nice transition from dinosaur books into more contemporary aspects of science for dinosaur fans. Recommended for middle schools and public libraries.

  • Shelby Soukup
    2018-11-20 09:03

    "Billions of Years, Amazing Changes" by Laurence Pringle is a very unique non-fiction option for upper elementary students. It is very lengthy and has advanced topics, so it may not be a very good fit for anyone too young. However, I thought this non-fiction was very unique because it did not just talk about dinosaurs or the Earth. This book explains the evolution of the Earth over time. It covers dinosaurs plus so much more! I think of it as a step above your typical dinosaur non-fiction book for children. I don’t think children too often get to think about the evolution of the Earth and how it came to be what it is today, so this book is a great choice to expand their horizons. I would choose to pair this with the classic children’s fiction, “Dinosaurs before Dawn” of the Magic Tree House series by Mary Pope Osborne. In this fiction story, the kids are curious about how their treehouse came to be. So, the treehouse takes them on an adventure back to the time of the dinosaurs. I believe these two books would make a good pair because you could read “Dinosaurs before Dawn” to the class or have it as their reading assignment. Once they have read that, you could introduce “Billions of Years, Amazing Changes” to tie in dinosaurs and the evolution which could help explain how the world and the treehouse came to be.

  • Jordan Davis
    2018-11-10 11:11

    This non-fiction chapter book discusses Charles Darwin’s idea of evolution. Author, Pringle, draws in readers in the beginning of the book by discussing how fossils were such a mystery. By describing how fossils are formed and found he dives into the Charles Darwin’s great discovery. The book then travels into the different characteristics of evolution and describes each in great depth. These include: Variation, Nature’s Bounty, Competition and Natural selection. After these are explained the time after Darwin is described and this story is told. For example genetics have now currently impacted our evolution but Darwin was not the one to have figured this out. Species and what makes certain animals a part of species is also described. Author ends the book by explaining how evolution is currently going on and is never ending. This book is a perfect mixture of science and pictures that allows readers to understand the idea of evolution while enjoying the book. The book has a glossary, index, table of contents and reference section, which allows readers to easily navigate through it to find information. This book would be great for students to begin to grasp an understanding of evolution. It would also be helpful to look up information about this subject for elementary students.

  • David Korsak
    2018-11-12 10:13

    This book is about the history of scientific discoveries relating to the topic of evolution. The book begins with geologists noticing that rock layers were made by powerful forces from inside the Earth. The book then goes on to discuss the voyages of Charles Darwin and how his discovery on the Galapagos Islands led to the theory of evolution. Pringle then defines evolution has “change over time, and this change depends on basic characteristics of nature.” He then goes on to explain that variation, competition, and natural selection are the characteristics. Towards the end of the book Pringle talks about how several fields of science have contributed to understanding the “how”. He then goes on to list a couple of those hows. First geologists have discovered how to tell the age of rocks by measuring their radioactive decay. Secondly Scientists discovered DNA and figured out not only how genes work, but how mutations in DNA cause variation. These are just a couple from the book. I thought this book was extremely factual and informative with regards to science, but entertaining enough for kids not to get bored. This book makes science look like its fun and interesting instead of boring.

  • Tasha Gonzalez
    2018-12-08 08:02

    Pringle does a fantastic job not only writing but ultimately teaching students and readers the concepts and factors that truly make up evolution. This topic is quite controversial but as the same time is not often well-understood by most Americans and often criticism comes from the same people who did not get a full, complete lesson on what evolution stands for. This is a chapter book but includes various pictures of fossils and diagrams to convey the meaning of science. This children's book helped strengthen my own understanding of co-evoultion that was sort of hazy even though I've taken multiple college science courses that discussed this. Also, the last chapters came full circle and introduced modern techniques far beyond what Darwin or anyone else thought was possible like the work of genetics and radioactive elements to tell time. However, it is brave to write a book on evolution in general, especially meant for children.

  • Kate MacMillan
    2018-12-09 11:16

    Ever since Charles Darwin revealed his landmark ideas about evolution in 1859, new findings have confirmed, expanded, and refined his concepts. Now, author Laurence Pringle, one of the nation's premier science writers, brings together the pillars of evidence that support our understanding of evolution in this ALA Notable Children's Book. Field biology, genetics, geology, paleontology, and medicine all add to the impressive structure of evidence. With a perfect blend of science and art, renowned illustrator Steve Jenkins creates stunning new depictions of important concepts and key evolutionary scientists. More than fifty photographs capture natural marvels, including awe-inspiring fossils, life forms, and geological wonders. The result is a full, clear, and up-to-date account of the monumental evidence supporting the modern view of evolution. IL 3-6 Lexile Level 1000

  • Mary
    2018-11-20 12:16

    I was wavering between three and four stars for this one. It's a handsome, clear, and useful book that does what it's designed to do: it introduces evolution, and the reasoning behind it, to a middle-school aged audience. Because the text covers a great deal of ground (from continental drift to DNA to viral and bacterial mutations and exactly what a "species" is - not to speak of Lamarck, Huxley and Darwin!), it can only skim the surface of this complex subject. Gregor Mendel gets dismissed in a paragraph, and Barbara McClintock and Rosalind Franklin are not mentioned at all. Nevertheless, with its clear, accessible style, well-chosen illustrations, and good index and bibliography, this is a worthwhile introduction for tweens. I'd recommend it for most libraries, but I'd also hope that children who picked up this book did not stop their exploration of evolution and genetics here.

  • Angie
    2018-11-15 09:01

    Wonderful book on evolution for elementary age students. This book has clear and concise chapters on everything from DNA to continental drift to fossils to diseases. The illustrations are wonderfully clear and bright and really fit the text. Of course, there is so much covered by the book (basically everything that falls under evolution) that it only skims the surface on each topic. But there are a lot of wonderful tidbits of information in here that I wasn't aware of. I never thought of the study of diseases and drug-resistant bacterias as evolution but it is. I didn't realize there were 60 different kinds of honeycreepers in Hawaii and that they all came from finches. There is lots of good info in this book and all of it is a good jumping off place for the study of evolution.

  • Tiffany
    2018-11-26 07:18

    This could be read by a girl or boy who are in the grade 5 to 8. This book explains why unusual birds and plants evolve on isolated, faraway islands. The book describes the fossils that are shown with birds that have evolved from dinosaurs and whales from land mammals. It also gives examples of evolution that is happening right now with the species of birds, lizards, and bedbugs, and the rise to drug-resistant diseases. Then it also tells the exciting discoveries from genetics and other sciences to our growing understanding of how evolution works.This book has great pictures, bright colors, and captions with some of the pictures.NCTE Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children 2012

  • Ruth
    2018-11-27 06:24

    A gotta have for any school library as it addresses a subject in such a manner than even the most resistant reader will find him/herself flipping pages and even reading! Oh my!! Beautiful color photographs are supplemented by Stephen Jenkins' incredible cut paper illustrations. The needles on the cactus the cactus finch is sitting on look so real that you just have to touch them to make sure they aren't! Pringle is one of my all time favorite NF authors and pairing him with the talented Jenkins makes this a book that will be read and enjoyed by all ages.

  • Sandy Brehl
    2018-11-25 10:57

    An impressively comprehensive text on evlolution. Authoritative, readable, and richly detailed, but also very text-heavy for any unmotivated readers. Steve Jenkins is well-known for his oversized and intense illustrations, but here he served up scientific drawings to supplement the photographic images. The glossary is excellent, but I yearned for an index to make the text and specific information more retrievable.This would be a great follow-up to the more accessible Ubiquitous.

  • Kimberly Wees
    2018-12-07 07:19

    Audience: 2nd grade to 5th grade students interested in the story of evolution. Appeal: This is a great book for children interested in evolution, from animals to humans and to plants. This book was very easy to read, but informative and precise. It got to the point on various topics that would keep the reader interested. Because fiction can be sometimes harder to read, the index, glossary, and captions made it easier to follow. Billions of Years, Amazing Changes 2011

  • AnnieM
    2018-11-11 11:15

    I quite enjoy it. Ok that might be a bit strong. I've never really loved science books. This book makes a dry, boring, painful (all my personal descriptors) engaging and informative. The photos and illustrations explain the text really well. The captions for the photos still tell a complete although much abbreviated story. The concepts and history of evolution is clearly and concisely told story. It is the perfect text for anyone who wants a basic knowledge of evolution.

  • Heather
    2018-12-07 11:10

    There aren't many books on evolution that are written for children, so this is fairly unique. Overall it does a good job, but sometimes I though the train of thought was a bit hard to follow. And sometimes the details seemed incomplete or confusing. But most of the book was interesting and would probably be useful for report writers or young scientists.

  • Carol
    2018-12-05 09:57

    Great introduction to evolution with a mixture of photographs and cool illustrations by Steve Jenkins. I wish it had more of these photos and illustrations than it did though. Unless it was picked by a kid with a strong interest in evolution I think it would lose their attention quickly.

  • Brenda Kahn
    2018-11-17 04:18

    Attractive, conversational, informative. A worthy addition to the middle school library.

  • Ms. Jackson
    2018-11-13 09:18

    If you are looking to understand evolution, this is a great book to better understand it better - very interesting.

  • Jean
    2018-11-16 12:14

    Great introduction to evolution for kids! However, I would have preferred a layout featuring narrower text blocks.

  • stillme
    2018-12-01 11:19

    ALSC Notable 2012

  • B
    2018-11-22 10:24

    The theory of evolution well explained with many photographs and illustrations and including historical information.

  • Mary
    2018-12-04 06:05

    Narrative non fiction

  • Ann
    2018-11-23 07:14

    Notable Children's Book, 2013 ALA

  • Susan
    2018-11-26 09:18

    A great overview of evolutionary sciences - lots to spark a child's further interests.

  • Anne
    2018-12-02 11:10

    Very nicely done introduction to evolution for elementary age kids. Well researched, with a nice glossary, index, and bibliography. Happy I added it to the library collection.